Virginia

Evictions

Know Your Rights

  • Eviction by the Sheriff (Writ of Possession) PDF

    You do not have to move simply because a landlord says so orally or in writing, or files a Summons for Unlawful Detainer in court. However, if your landlord gives you proper written notice, files a Summons for Unlawful Detainer, goes to a court hearing, gets an Order of Possession from the court, and gets a “Writ of Possession” from the court, you almost certainly will have to move. Content Detail

    By:
    Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • Evictions (including Lockouts and Utility Shutoffs)

    Every tenant has the legal right to remain in their rental housing unless and until the landlord follows the legal process for eviction. The process depends on whether your rental housing is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA). Generally speaking, the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act, or VRLTA, applies to apartment complexes, regardless of the number of apartments; single-family houses, if the landlord rents out more than two of them; and hotels, motels, or boarding houses if the tenant has been renting for more than 90 days or has a written lease for more than 90 days. If your rental is not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other state laws that apply to your situation. If you do not know which law applies, you should seek advice from an attorney. Read More

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Know Your Rights: A Guide for Tenants Renting in the State of Virginia PDF

    Under Virginia Law, tenants have certain rights when they move in, while they are renting, and before they can be evicted. The specific rights you have depend on whether or not your tenancy is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (VRLTA). You are covered by the VRLTA if you live in an apartment building or in any type of multi-family housing. Multi-family housing means you share heating, hot water, entry and exit, or some other service with another unit in the same building. You also are covered if you live in a single family house and your landlord rents out more than ten single-family homes in a county or more than four single-family homes in a city. Throughout this handout we will tell you what general rights you have as a tenant and specify if there are any differences depending on whether you are covered by the VRLTA. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.