Virginia

Landlord and Tenant Issues

Know Your Rights

  • Forms to help with issues with your landlord

    You can use this program to create letters to your landlord if you feel you are living in unsafe conditions, if you are in danger of being evicted or if your landlord failed to return your security deposit. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Poverty Law Center
  • Let us know your thoughts on the online program you just used!

    This short survey will help us serve you better as we continue to improve our interactive programs. Please take a few minutes to let you know what you thought about the online program you just completed. Content Detail

  • Model Lease word

    This Model Lease is intended for use by residential landlords and tenants. If you are considering using this lease, you should read all of the paragraphs of the lease and make sure you understand and agree with the terms they discuss. Once it is signed by both the landlord and the tenant, the lease is a legally binding contract. If you have any questions about anything in this lease, you should talk to an attorney about the lease before you sign it. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Poverty Law Center
  • Your Rights as a Tenant PDF

    Under Virginia Law, tenants have certain rights when they move in, while they are renting, and before they can be evicted. The specific rights you have depend on whether or not your tenancy is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (VRLTA). You are covered by the VRLTA if you live in an apartment building or in any type of multi-family housing. Multi-family housing means you share heating, hot water, entry and exit, or some other service with another unit in the same building. You also are covered if you live in a single family house and your landlord rents out more than ten single-family homes in a county or more than four single-family homes in a city. Throughout this handout we will tell you what general rights you have as a tenant and specify if there are any differences depending on whether you are covered by the VRLTA. If you are not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other laws that give you certain rights and protections. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • National Mortgage Settlement: What You Need to Know PDF

    It will take six to nine months for administrators of the National Mortgage Settlement to start contacting claimants and distributing benefits. In the meantime, scammers are trying to make money by falsely claiming to have an inside track to mortgage relief. Ignore the scammers and educate yourself about what to expect. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Poverty Law Center
  • Federally Subsidized Housing-Tenant-Based PDF

    Federally subsidized housing means that the government pays part or all of your rent. The part of your rent the government pays is called the “subsidy.” There are two types of federally subsidized housing. In one type, the subsidy is tied to the tenant. This is called “tenant-based assistance.” In the other type, the subsidy is tied to the housing unit. This is called “unit-based assistance.” This article is about tenant-based assisted housing. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • Virginia’s Early Lease Termination Law for Domestic and Sexual Violence Victims

    Virginia’s new early lease termination law provides certain victims of family abuse, sexual abuse and sexual assault the right to terminate their residential leases. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Poverty Law Center
  • Know Your Rights: A Guide for Tenants Renting in the State of Virginia PDF

    Under Virginia Law, tenants have certain rights when they move in, while they are renting, and before they can be evicted. The specific rights you have depend on whether or not your tenancy is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (VRLTA). You are covered by the VRLTA if you live in an apartment building or in any type of multi-family housing. Multi-family housing means you share heating, hot water, entry and exit, or some other service with another unit in the same building. You also are covered if you live in a single family house and your landlord rents out more than ten single-family homes in a county or more than four single-family homes in a city. Throughout this handout we will tell you what general rights you have as a tenant and specify if there are any differences depending on whether you are covered by the VRLTA. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • Eviction by the Sheriff (Writ of Possession) PDF

    You do not have to move simply because a landlord says so orally or in writing, or files a Summons for Unlawful Detainer in court. However, if your landlord gives you proper written notice, files a Summons for Unlawful Detainer, goes to a court hearing, gets an Order of Possession from the court, and gets a “Writ of Possession” from the court, you almost certainly will have to move. Content Detail

    By:
    Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • Evictions (including Lockouts and Utility Shutoffs)

    Every tenant has the legal right to remain in their rental housing unless and until the landlord follows the legal process for eviction. The process depends on whether your rental housing is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA). Generally speaking, the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act, or VRLTA, applies to apartment complexes, regardless of the number of apartments; single-family houses, if the landlord rents out more than two of them; and hotels, motels, or boarding houses if the tenant has been renting for more than 90 days or has a written lease for more than 90 days. If your rental is not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other state laws that apply to your situation. If you do not know which law applies, you should seek advice from an attorney. Read More

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Questions and Answers about Security Deposits PDF

    This pamphlet contains general information about your rights. Consult a lawyer if you have specific questions. Content Detail

    By:
    Blue Ridge Legal Services, Inc.
  • Security Deposits PDF

    One of the first costs that you have when you move into a new home, apartment or trailer park is a security deposit. This is money paid to the landlord to protect the landlord in case you cause any damages to the property or in case there is rent due when you move out. Sometimes you may be charged an extra deposit if you have a pet. The following information deals with security deposits where the landlord is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA) or the Manufactured Home Lot Rental Act (MHLRA). Generally speaking, the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act, or VRLTA, applies to apartment complexes, regardless of the number of apartments; single-family houses, if the landlord rents out more than two of them; and hotels, motels, or boarding houses if the tenant has been renting for more than 90 days or has a written lease for more than 90 days. If your rental is not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other state laws that apply to your situation. If you do not know which law applies, you should seek advice from an attorney. Content Detail

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • What Happens If I Am Late On My Rent?

    What happens if I am late on my rent? Read More

    By:
    Virginia Poverty Law Center
  • Can My Landlord Bar My Guest From My Rental Property?

    A landlord can keep your guest from coming to the house or apartment that you rent if that person breaks the rules in the lease or breaks the law. This applies to rental properties covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA) and to mobile home parks covered by the Manufactured Home Lot Rental Act (MHLRA). Read More

    By:
    Virginia Legal Aid Society, Inc.