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Landlord and Tenant Issues

Know Your Rights
25 Resource(s) Found

BASIC VIRGINIA LANDLORD-TENANT LAW

This pdf presentation will provide an overview of the basics of Virginia Landlord-Tenant law.

Evictions (including Lockouts and Utility Shutoffs)

Every tenant has the legal right to remain in their rental housing unless and until the landlord follows the legal process for eviction. The process depends on whether your rental housing is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA). Generally speaking, the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act, or VRLTA, applies to apartment complexes, regardless of the number of apartments; single-family houses, if the landlord rents out more than two of them; and hotels, motels, or boarding houses if the tenant has been renting for more than 90 days or has a written lease for more than 90 days. If your rental is not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other state laws that apply to your situation. If you do not know which law applies, you should seek advice from an attorney.

Evictions (including Lockouts and Utility Shutoffs) - Additional Resource - PDF Document

Every tenant has the legal right to live in rental housing unless and until the landlord follows the legal process for eviction. You are a tenant if you pay regular amounts of rent during regular time periods, such as once a month or once a week. You also are a tenant if you have lived in a hotel or motel for more than 90 days, or you are subject to a written lease for a period of more than 90 days. You are not a tenant if you have lived in a hotel or motel for less than 90 days. In this case, the only legal right you have is to receive a five day “pay or quit” notice before your landlord evicts you by self-help without going to court. The following pdf document provides questions and answers about what to do about eviction issues, including lockouts and utility shutoffs.

Fair Housing

Generally, a landlord may rent or refuse to rent for any reason at all – good reason, bad reason, or no reason – as long as it is not a prohibited reason. However, there are exceptions to this rule if you are in a protected class covered by the Fair Housing Law. This document contains information on the Fair Housing Law.

Getting Repairs

You have the legal right to live in a home that is safe and healthy. You must follow the law to get bad rental housing repaired. To fix problems that make a home unsafe, the law divides the duties between the landlord and the tenant. You are a tenant if you pay regular amounts of rent during regular time periods, such as once a month or once a week. You also are a tenant if you have lived in a hotel or motel for more than 90 days, or you are subject to a written lease for a period of more than 90 days.

Know Your Rights: A Guide for Tenants Renting in the State of Virginia Introduction - PDF Document

Under Virginia law, tenants have certain rights when they move in, while they are renting, and before they can be evicted. You are a tenant if you pay regular amounts of rent during regular time periods, such as once a month or once a week. You also are a tenant if you have lived in a hotel or motel for more than 90 days, or you are subject to a written lease for a period of more than 90 days. You are not a tenant if you have lived in a hotel or motel for less than 90 days. In this case, the only legal right you have is to receive a five day “pay or quit” notice before your landlord evicts you by self-help without going to court. Download this pdf sheet to learn more about your rights as a tenant.

National Mortgage Settlement: What You Need to Know

It will take six to nine months for administrators of the National Mortgage Settlement to start contacting claimants and distributing benefits. In the meantime, scammers are trying to make money by falsely claiming to have an inside track to mortgage relief. Ignore the scammers and educate yourself about what to expect.

7 NEW LAWS THAT ARE MORE FAIR, FAVORABLE & FRIENDLY TO TENANTS - PDF Document

Starting July 1, 2019, seven new laws will take effect in Virginia. All seven are more fair, favorable and friendly to tenants. They all were passed as a response to the high rate of evictions in Virginia, which are more than two times the national average. In many cities in Virginia, evictions are more than four times the national average. The following pdf provides the seven new laws in more detail.

Questions and Answers about Security Deposits

This pamphlet contains general information about your rights. Consult a lawyer if you have specific questions.

Security Deposits

Under Virginia law, landlords and tenants must follow specific rules about security deposits. You are a tenant if you pay regular amounts of rent during regular time periods, such as once a month or once a week. You also are a tenant if you have lived in a hotel or motel for more than 90 days, or you are subject to a written lease for a period of more than 90 days.

Tenant’s Right to Prevent Eviction for Non-payment of Rent by Redemption, Redemption Tender, or Extended Redemption

If your landlord wants to evict you for not paying rent, the landlord must give you a written notice to either move or pay rent in 5 days. If you pay the rent in 5 days, you get to stay. If you do not pay, the landlord can start an unlawful detainer action (an eviction) in General District Court (GDC) by filing a Summons for Unlawful Detainer. You do not have to move just because your landlord has given a written notice, or because your landlord has filed in court. If the court finds you do owe rent, you can be evicted. However, you may be able to prevent eviction by paying all amounts owed, or by offering to pay all amounts owed, if there are no other reasons stated for eviction.

Your Rights as a Tenant

Under Virginia Law, tenants have certain rights when they move in, while they are renting, and before they can be evicted. The specific rights you have depend on whether or not your tenancy is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (VRLTA). You are covered by the VRLTA if you live in an apartment building or in any type of multi-family housing. Multi-family housing means you share heating, hot water, entry and exit, or some other service with another unit in the same building. You also are covered if you live in a single family house and your landlord rents out more than ten single-family homes in a county or more than four single-family homes in a city. Throughout this handout we will tell you what general rights you have as a tenant and specify if there are any differences depending on whether you are covered by the VRLTA. If you are not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other laws that give you certain rights and protections.

BASIC VIRGINIA LANDLORD-TENANT LAW

This pdf presentation will provide an overview of the basics of Virginia Landlord-Tenant law.

Can My Landlord Bar My Guest From My Rental Property?

A landlord can keep your guest from coming to the house or apartment that you rent if that person breaks the rules in the lease or breaks the law. This applies to rental properties covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA) and to mobile home parks covered by the Manufactured Home Lot Rental Act (MHLRA).

Eviction by the Sheriff (Writ of Eviction)

You do not have to move simply because a landlord says so orally or in writing, or files a Summons for Unlawful Detainer in court. However, if your landlord gives you proper written notice, files a Summons for Unlawful Detainer, goes to a court hearing, gets an Order of Possession from the court, and gets a “Writ of Possession” from the court, you almost certainly will have to move.

Federally Subsidized Housing-Tenant-Based

Federally subsidized housing means that the government pays part or all of your rent. The part of your rent the government pays is called the “subsidy.” There are two types of federally subsidized housing. In one type, the subsidy is tied to the tenant. This is called “tenant-based assistance.” In the other type, the subsidy is tied to the housing unit. This is called “unit-based assistance.” This article is about tenant-based assisted housing.

Know Your Rights: A Guide for Tenants Renting in the State of Virginia

Under Virginia Law, tenants have certain rights when they move in, while they are renting, and before they can be evicted. The specific rights you have depend on whether or not your tenancy is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (VRLTA). You are covered by the VRLTA if you live in an apartment building or in any type of multi-family housing. Multi-family housing means you share heating, hot water, entry and exit, or some other service with another unit in the same building. You also are covered if you live in a single family house and your landlord rents out more than ten single-family homes in a county or more than four single-family homes in a city. Throughout this handout we will tell you what general rights you have as a tenant and specify if there are any differences depending on whether you are covered by the VRLTA.

7 NEW LAWS THAT ARE MORE FAIR, FAVORABLE & FRIENDLY TO TENANTS - PDF Document

Starting July 1, 2019, seven new laws will take effect in Virginia. All seven are more fair, favorable and friendly to tenants. They all were passed as a response to the high rate of evictions in Virginia, which are more than two times the national average. In many cities in Virginia, evictions are more than four times the national average. The following pdf provides the seven new laws in more detail.

New Protection for Virginians with Serious Medical Conditions

Virginia utility customers who have a serious medical condition, or who share a household with a family member with a serious medical condition, now can get a reprieve from cutoffs when they cannot pay their water or electricity bills on time.

Repairs and Maintenance of Rental Property

You have the legal right to live in a home that is safe and healthy. You must follow the law to get bad rental housing repaired. To fix problems that make a home unsafe, the law divides the duties between the landlord and the tenant. How these duties are divided depends on whether your rental housing is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA). Generally speaking, the VRLTA applies to apartment complexes, regardless of the number of apartments; single-family houses if the landlord rents out more than two of them; and hotels, motels, or boarding houses if the tenant has been renting for more than 90 days or has a written lease for more than 90 days. If your rental is not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other state laws that apply to your situation. If you do not know which law applies, you should seek advice from an attorney.

Security Deposits

One of the first costs that you have when you move into a new home, apartment or trailer park is a security deposit. This is money paid to the landlord to protect the landlord in case you cause any damages to the property or in case there is rent due when you move out. Sometimes you may be charged an extra deposit if you have a pet. The following information deals with security deposits where the landlord is covered by the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act (VRLTA) or the Manufactured Home Lot Rental Act (MHLRA). Generally speaking, the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act, or VRLTA, applies to apartment complexes, regardless of the number of apartments; single-family houses, if the landlord rents out more than two of them; and hotels, motels, or boarding houses if the tenant has been renting for more than 90 days or has a written lease for more than 90 days. If your rental is not covered by the VRLTA, there may be other state laws that apply to your situation. If you do not know which law applies, you should seek advice from an attorney.

What Happens if my Rental Housing is Destroyed?

This article describes your rights if your rental housing is destroyed by fire or other casualty.

7 NEW LAWS THAT ARE MORE FAIR, FAVORABLE & FRIENDLY TO TENANTS - PDF Document

Starting July 1, 2019, seven new laws will take effect in Virginia. All seven are more fair, favorable and friendly to tenants. They all were passed as a response to the high rate of evictions in Virginia, which are more than two times the national average. In many cities in Virginia, evictions are more than four times the national average. The following pdf provides the seven new laws in more detail.

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